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succourvaria [2018/06/27 18:30]
givanbela
succourvaria [2018/08/29 14:44]
givanbela
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 +===== Newspaper item =====
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 +{{ :​succour:​scheur.png?​300 |}}
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 ===== Fiction/​Literature ===== ===== Fiction/​Literature =====
  
 Lots of historical dystopic/​utopic novels have been written, in almost any existing language, about the past, the future, and the present. Like in pop music one has the heroes and stars, like George Orwell (1984, 1949 and Animal Farm, 1945), Aldous Huxley (Brave New World, 1932 but also Ape and Essence, 1948), Samuel Butler (Erewhon, 1872), H. G. Wells (When The Sleeper Awakes, 1899), Jules Verne (Paris in the Twentieth Century, 1863), Yevgeny Zamyatin (We, 1921), Ernst Jünger (Heliopolis,​ 1949), or Arthur Koestler (Darkness at Noon, 1940). ​ Lots of historical dystopic/​utopic novels have been written, in almost any existing language, about the past, the future, and the present. Like in pop music one has the heroes and stars, like George Orwell (1984, 1949 and Animal Farm, 1945), Aldous Huxley (Brave New World, 1932 but also Ape and Essence, 1948), Samuel Butler (Erewhon, 1872), H. G. Wells (When The Sleeper Awakes, 1899), Jules Verne (Paris in the Twentieth Century, 1863), Yevgeny Zamyatin (We, 1921), Ernst Jünger (Heliopolis,​ 1949), or Arthur Koestler (Darkness at Noon, 1940). ​
  
-One could add most of the novels by William Gibson (the trilogy Neuromancer,​ 1984, Count Zero, 1986, and Mona Lisa Overdrive, 1988), and Margeret Atwood (the trilogy: Oryx and Crake, 2003,  The Year of the Flood, 2009, and Maddaddam, 2013), Karel Čapek (R.U.R., 1920, and War of the Newts, 1936), Kurt Vonnegut (Player Piano or: Utopia 14, 1952, and Galápagos, 1985), Ray Bradbury (Fahrenheit 451, 1953), Philip K. Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? or: Blade Runner, 1968, Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, 1974), Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed:​ An Ambiguous Utopia, 1974), ​ Cormac Mc Carthy (The Road, 2006) and even David Foster Wallace (Infinite Jest, 1996). Recently Ursula Le Guin and Todd Barton were working at a new edition of their cassette+book release Always Coming Home / Music and Poetry of the Kesh from 1985. +One could add most of the novels by William Gibson (the trilogy Neuromancer,​ 1984, Count Zero, 1986, and Mona Lisa Overdrive, 1988), and Margeret Atwood (the trilogy: Oryx and Crake, 2003,  The Year of the Flood, 2009, and Maddaddam, 2013), Karel Čapek (R.U.R., 1920, and War of the Newts, 1936), Kurt Vonnegut (Player Piano or: Utopia 14, 1952, and Galápagos, 1985), Ray Bradbury (Fahrenheit 451, 1953), Philip K. Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? or: Blade Runner, 1968, Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, 1974), Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed:​ An Ambiguous Utopia, 1974),  ​Octavia Buttler (esp. The Lilith Brood'​s trilogy), ​Cormac Mc Carthy (The Road, 2006) and even David Foster Wallace (Infinite Jest, 1996). Recently Ursula Le Guin and Todd Barton were working at a new edition of their cassette+book release Always Coming Home / Music and Poetry of the Kesh from 1985. 
  
 Probably there are more books that could qualify as dystopian, but these came to mind spontaneously. ​ Probably there are more books that could qualify as dystopian, but these came to mind spontaneously. ​
succourvaria.txt · Last modified: 2018/08/29 14:44 by givanbela